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The truth behind the suspicion

Dec 19,2018
The disbandment of a special inspection team under the office of the presidential senior secretary for civil affairs over its suspected wrongdoings has led to a different type of controversy about the Blue House condoning the secret police-like activity of spying on civilians.

A member of the inspection team blew the whistle about Korean Ambassador to Russia Woo Yoon-keun, who was implicated in a bribery case.

Kim Tae-wu, the investigator, said he was victimized by the Blue House for tracking Woo, a confidante of President Moon Jae-in.

Kim also claimed that, under the presidential office’s silent endorsement, he and other team members regularly followed and reported on senior diplomats, the business transactions of a son of a former prime minister, government offices’ work on constitutional reform and the activities of big bank presidents.

If what Kim claims is true, the Moon administration, borne out of the impeachment of former President Park Geun-hye for power abuse, black-listing and illicit surveillance, has more or less repeated the same wrongdoings.

The Blue House claimed it did nothing illicit, but the presidential office was elusive on the accusations that Woo had pocketed 10 million won ($8,850) from a man connected to him.

The hyped response from the presidential office only deepened suspicions. The chief of staff, the senior presidential spokesman, the secretary for civil affairs and other spokesmen all came forward to criticize Kim for spreading “false information.”

To leave no questions behind, the Blue House must get to the bottom of the abuse of power case as was the case for former President Park Geun-hye.

The whistle-blower also must not be targeted during this process.

JoongAng Ilbo, Dec. 18, Page 30