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2017.11.16 Museums & Galleries

Nov 16,2017
THINGS I KNOW

Arko Art Center, Jongno District

To Sunday: This exhibition allows visitors to take a look at the aesthetic aspects of hangul, the Korean alphabet, through a work co-created by the famous artist Kang Ik-joong and 2,300 others. As a variation of his “Things I Know” (2010) project, Kang asked 2,300 people, including Korean citizens and those learning the Korean language, as well as some celebrities, to write sentences that are always in their minds, using crayons on three-inch by three-inch square panels - one syllable per panel.

The sentences range from aphorisms to words of wisdom. After receiving thousands of sentences, Kang combined them to create the grand-scale public work.

Admission is free. The museum is closed on Monday. Go to Hyehwa station, line No. 4, eixt No. 2 and walk five minutes through the Marronnier Park.

(02) 760-4850, http://art.arko.or.kr



LEE SANGWON: THE COLORS OF THE CROWD

Sungkok Art Museum, Jongno District

To Sunday: The solo show features about 70 pieces of art, mainly paintings, by Korean artist Lee Sangwon. As the title suggests, the paintings depict crowds at amusement parks, beaches, pop concerts and even candlelight vigils. Each painting has more than one perspective.

“I work based on my photographs of the crowd,” the 39-year-old artist said at the opening of the exhibition last month. “I’ve been interested in the crowd and their flow. It is our collective portrait in the world.”

Admission is 5,000 won ($4.44) for adults. The museum is closed on Mondays. Go to Gwanghwamun Station, line No. 5, exit 1, and walk for 10 minutes.

(02) 737-7650, www.sungkokmuseum.org



LEE BONGREAL - VOYAGE WITHIN SPACE

Gallery Hyundai, Jongno District

To Nov. 26: The solo exhibition of veteran Korean artist Lee Bongreal, 80, shows how his abstract art has evolved from the 1970s to today in 20 paintings. Lee’s paintings in the 70s, which were inspired by light through changho, or a Korean traditional door-window made of translucent paper bolstered by wooden grids, had grids and soft light in them. From the 1980s, grids disappeared in his paintings but characteristics like achromatic tones and soft light remained and evolved with diverse forms of brush strokes. “I have looked after spaces of delicate resonance and peace in my paintings,” the artist told reporters in October.Admission is free. The gallery is closed on Monday. Go to Anguk Station, line No. 3, exit 1, and walk for 10 minutes.

(02) 2287-3500, www.galleryhyundai.com



KOREA ARTIST PRIZE

MMCA Seoul, Jongno District

To Feb. 18, 2018: This is an exhibition of the four artists nominated for the sixth “Korea Artist Prize,” granted by the museum and the SBS Foundation, since this year’s edition looks like a well-designed group exhibition under a specific theme rather than a competition. The 2017 finalists are Bek Hyunjin, Sunny Kim, Kelvin Kyungkun Park and Song Sanghee. All of them are quite different from one another in style and medium they use. But their works can be linked to create a story about the realities of Korean society as perceived by individuals.

Admission is 4,000 won. Go to Anguk Station, line No. 3, exit 1 and walk for 10 minutes.

(02) 3701-9500, www.mmca.go.kr